Double Dutch, - an evolution from the street.

Double dutch began life probably on the streets of affluent cities like New York and Liverpool as a progression from decades of jumping long ropes, - thus the term jump rope.

Sometime in the 40's and 50's industrious children started using the spare length of the same rope to make a second jump rope. With a little more ingenuity double dutch was born. This was a time in English speaking history in which anything baffling would likely be called double dutch. The juxtapose of early two ropes turning in opposite directions but was actually one rope made it a perfect candidate to be coined double dutch.

By the 50's jumping rope and double dutch was at the height of it's popularity just like many street and playground games of the time. With the advent of pop culture in the 60's double dutch fell out of favor till the 70's where in the US it enjoyed a revival as a sport. The sport crosssed oceans to Europe and Australia in the 80's culmanating in the first Word Championship in Australia in 1997.

At about this time double dutch was brewing in Japan. Their culturally imbune double dutch style is reminiscent of how double dutch came to be, - street style using woven ropes with no sex bias players. A decade later this double double style has fans accross the world.

Double dutch has now come a full circle home to it's street fusion style beginnings. How double dutch got it's name is another story here.



Early long rope jumping and double dutch photos.



July 1935: Sailors from HMS Fury and two women jumping rope on a beach in New Jersey USA.


1946 LIFE magazine: Children playing on a US main street.


1950's: Church. The woman on right is holding center of rope infront of her.


1950's: UK school. The turner on the left has the long rope looped around her body.


1980's: Girl on right has long rope around her neck. This was probably how the reverse grip she is using was born.


1980's: Boy on left holding center of rope infront of himself.


1990's: Girl on right has long rope around her neck.


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